At what point is being “woke” not enough?

At what point do we start having a conversation about the actions of people like Nick Robinson, Ben Hopkins, Devin Faraci, and Hugo Schwyzer? At what point do we acknowledge that there may be a worrying pattern of “woke” folks who end up being outed as abusers?

At what point do we recognize that many people don’t practice what they preach? At what point do we recognize that adopting the language of social justice isn’t all that hard? At what point do we realize that the adoption of the language of social justice isn’t necessarily the pursuit of social justice? At what point do we acknowledge that our emphasis on language over praxis may have contributed to the trend of activist abusers?

At what point do we stop being surprised by this?

At what point does the backlash against “soft boy culture” begin? At what point does “soft boy” become another cultural signifier for chauvinist or predatory attitudes? At what point do we realize that the same thing happened with “nice guys”? At what point do we realize that stereotypes are ultimately useless for identifying abusers in our communities and the over-reliance on them allows actual predators to roam free? At what point do we break the cycle?

At what point do our communities develop better systems for reporting harassment and abuse? At what point do we learn to create a safer environment for victims? At what point do we stop punishing those who come forward? At what point will the stigma of victimhood be erased?

At what point do our communities become better at self-policing? At what point do we learn to trust our suspicions, even of people we generally like? At what point do we realize that a person’s public image might be incongruous with their private life? At what point do we acknowledge that retweeting and reblogging the “right” people could very well mean retweeting and reblogging abusers?

At what point is being “woke” not enough?

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